A History in Logos – Fall 2014

Administrative and Box Office Manager Kimber Jonah assembled all of the logos the TMC has used over its history. Can you match the logo to the year it was introduced?
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Categories: Fall 2014.

Measuring our Impact – Fall 2014

If you were at the TMC’s opening Mozart and Haydn concert, you received a bright orange card in the concert program asking you to complete an online survey about your concert experience. This survey is part of a two-year 21-choir intrinsic impact research project being conducted by Chorus America and managed by the respected arts research firm WolfBrown. The Toronto Mendelssohn Choir is the only Canadian choir participating in this North-America-wide project.
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Categories: Fall 2014.

The New Ears Project – Fall 2014

The critics who review our concerts and audience members who take the time to tell us how they liked us are often “classical music people”: experienced aficionados of Classical music, who know what to expect from a concert. We love these people, and cherish them, and we feel that we have a pretty good idea of how to make concerts an enjoyable experience for them. Attracting new audience members presents a challenge for any classical music ensemble, but especially for an ensemble whose performances typically run only one evening.
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The Mighty Rhino Reviews the TMC’s Mozart and Haydn performance – Fall 2014

It’s not difficult to understand why even longstanding and tremendously accomplished choirs like the TMC occasionally worry about how to appeal to new generations of patrons; classical music is pigeonholed in the culture as a niche pursuit with an aged, lily-white target audience. But the labels are largely unfair, and with performances this inspired and beautifully put together, it’s hard not to have hope for the future.
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Voices from the Choir – Fall 2014

Voices from the Choir We asked choristers about their connection to the TMC’s heritage of excellence. Ngaio Potts, Soprano Susan Worthington, Alto Sam Broverman, Tenor Barry Clegg, Bass Ngaio Potts, Soprano How long have you been in the choir? Two years, but this is actually my second time in the choir. I first joined the choir the same year Noel did and sang with the TMC for four years the first time. How did you come to join the TMC?   I always loved the pieces that the TMC was performing and wanted to get back involved in singing great choral works. I was jealous of sitting in the house listening vs. being up there with everyone. How would you describe your connection to the TMC’s heritage of excellence in choral music? Being involved in music and part of a choir has always been a big part of my life. I grew up singing in choirs like the Ottawa Youth Choir and the Ontario Regional Youth Choir. I left home to get a music degree, then came to Toronto where I joined the TMC the first time. There is something about singing with the TMC that brings choral music to another level—the professionalism and the speed at which we work is exciting. How would you describe the TMC’s musical legacy? The TMC has such a rich history that I feel it has become an institution in the city that we should all be proud to be a part of. The choir is not only known across Canada but around the world for the caliber of the singing. I think it is important that we work together to keep choral music, and the TMC, going strong for generations to come. Choral music can be inspiring, emotional and powerful; the TMC lets people experience a range of emotions, to be moved by the music. The streaming of selected concerts is helping to get the TMC out there by letting more people nation-wide experience the joy of choral music. Are there (or have there been) any times when you feel especially connected to a tradition of music making in the TMC? Can you describe those times?   For me it is the holiday concerts. The festival of carols and the tradition of singing the Messiah with the TSO really make me feel like we are part of something bigger. So many people incorporate
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Categories: Fall 2014.

The Eyes Have it – Fall 2014

Barry Clegg sent along a poem from his book The Beginning of Time to accompany his interview questions. The Eyes Have It Barry Clegg In those bold days I understood almost everything. Pythagoras, the periodic table, and Sir Isaac taught me: this and this and this– thus this!   The chance to study a musical instrument arose. With its complex coils of brass, its heft, pistons, and curves, the French horn enticed me to a domain beyond the reach of Science. A demanding mistress it proved– surly if neglected, when flattered willing to pour forth flowing gold, to weep, whisper endearments, gallop along with the hunt, or brazen it out in a brass band. And fickle withal–triumph and disaster close as two sides of a coin. For a decade and a half we cavorted through the centuries up to ink-wet manuscripts of the day… till on a sideways impulse I auditioned for a first-rate concert choir.   How suddenly splendid to be splendid, performing to full houses, broadcast across the country. The horn was left behind in its dark case.   As a student once, overdosed on engineering drawing, I attempted a portrait of myself. Having no skill for likeness I angled out one stolid forthright persona. To omit the horn would be a deceit. In that portrait after fifty years I detect uncalculated depths: blocks upon blocks of inference and deduction, questioned by that mercurial instrument – and the eyes, one geared for facts and physics, one more open to doubt. Here stood then a young man poised between emotion and the laws of motion.   Untold youthful adventures on the high wire of horn playing ground my musical memories still. Should I ever try a second portrait, the edges would be softer, few lines quite so straight. The eyes are good, though, and the French horn would remain. « Previous Article
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Categories: Fall 2014.